Events

2019 Annual Meeting, Nov 23-26

The 2019 Annual Meeting will be in San Diego, CA, November 23-26. Register Now!

2020 Regional Meetings

Open Calls for Papers:

Rocky Mountains-Great Plains
Deadline: November 15, 2019

Southeast
Undergraduate Deadline: December 15, 2019

Mid-Atlantic
Deadline: December 16, 2019

Upper Midwest
Deadline: December 31, 2019

Pacific Northwest
Deadline: January 3, 2020

Midwest
Deadline: January 10, 2020

New England-Maritimes
Deadline: January 19, 2020

Eastern International
Deadline: February 1, 2020

Open Registration:

Mid-Atlantic

Midwest

Advertisement

Missionary Calculus Americans in the Making of Sunday Schools in Victorian India

Belvadi, Anilkumar

cover image of Hamsa Stainton's "Poetry as Prayer"

AAR members receive a 30% discount on all AAR/OUP series titles. Sign in to Member Discounts and click the link to OUP.

Description

How are religious educational institutions built? In histories of evangelical institution-building in the Victorian Indian colonial period (1858-1901), this question has mostly been addressed from the perspective of the religious ends that Christian missionaries sought to achieve and the ideological obstacles they encountered. This may be called the 'values' approach. Missionary Calculus sets this aside and examines, instead, the most routine transactions of missionaries in building an evangelical institution, the Sunday school. Missionaries daily struggled with and acted upon certain questions: How shall we acquire land and money to set up such schools? What methods shall we employ to attract students? What curriculum, books, and classroom materials shall we use? How shall we tune our hymns? Shall we employ non-Christians to teach in Christian Sunday schools? The makers of colonial Sunday schools focused obsessively on the means, the material and symbolic resources, with which they felt they could achieve certain immediate objectives. Such a transactional or 'instrumental' approach resulted in stated religious 'values' being insidiously compromised. Using insights from classical Weberian sociology, and through a close scrutiny of missionary means, this book shows how the success or failure of meeting evangelical ends may be assessed.

With extensive archival research, chiefly on American missionaries in colonial India, this work examines the formation of Sunday schools at the point of transnational, intercultural contact. Readers interested in religion, education, and colonial history should find the matter, method, outcomes, and narration of Missionary Calculus new and thought-provoking.

Addtional Information