Events

2017 Annual Meeting, Nov 18-21

Plan to join your colleagues in beautiful Boston for the 2017 AAR & SBL Annual Meetings. Regular rates end November 16. Register today!

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Twitter: #aarsbl17

2018 Regional Meetings

The following Calls for Papers are open:

Mid-Atlantic
Deadline: December 15

Rocky Mountain-Great Plains
Deadline: October 27

Southeast (SECSOR)
Deadline: October 15

Southwest (SWCRS)
Deadline: October 15

Upper Midwest
Deadline: January 6

Western
Deadline: October 1

2017 National Humanities Conference

Register by October 27 for the NHC conference in Boston.

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Religion and the Arts Award

Deadline: February 1

The AAR award in Religion and the Arts is presented annually to an artist, performer, critic, curator, or scholar who has made a recent significant contribution to the understanding of the relations among the arts and religions, both for the academy and for a broader public.

Nominations

Application Process

The Religion and the Arts Award Jury accepts nominations from AAR members, though nominees need not be AAR members. Nominations must include a supporting letter (no more than 1,000 words), and any relevant supporting materials (images, DVDs, books, catalogs, etc.). Please, no self-nominations.

To be considered for the annual award, nominations must be made by February 1.  Electronic submissions may be sent to Diane Apostolos-Cappadona at apostold@georgetown.edu. Paper submissions may be mailed to

Dr. Diane Apostolos-Cappadona
Catholic Studies Program
Georgetown University, Old Ryan 219
Washington, DC 20057

Electronic submissions are preferred. If a paper submission is made, please notify Dr. Apostolos-Cappadona by email at apostold@georgetown.edu.

Selection

The jury for the Religion and the Arts Award is listed here. The Award will be presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion. The award recipient also will be featured at a Special Topics Forum.


Winners

2016  

Shahzia Sikander
Sikander is a Pakistani-born American artist whose artwork is deeply rooted in Muslim and Hindu traditions of Indian and Persian miniature painting. From tiny layered drawings that insert the personal into traditional ritual forms, to video projections that re-interpret the miniature for the digital age, Sikander’s work ranges across media, including drawing, painting, large-scale installations, and performance. Her work is owned by numerous modern art collections around the world, and has been exhibited in solo and collective shows throughout Asia, Europe, and North America. In 2004, Newsweek listed Sikander as one of the most important South Asians transforming the American cultural landscape. She is a member of the Asian Art Council at the Guggenheim Museum, New York, and has also served on the artist advisory team for the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles.

2015   Marilynne Robinson
Robinson is an author who continually investigates the place of religion in modern life through her fiction and nonfiction alike. A highly respected professor of literature and creative writing at the University of Iowa, her writing has garnered both national and international recognition including a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, a Hemingway/Pen award, the Orange Prize, the Grawemeyer Award in Religion, the National Humanities Medal, and several nominations for the Man Booker International Prize. Her newest novel, Lila, won the 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award. Robinson advises that for her, "Religion is a framing mechanism. It is a language of orientation that presents itself as a series of questions. It talks about the arc of life and the quality of experience in ways that I’ve found fruitful to think about. Religion has been profoundly effective in enlarging human imagination and expression."
 
2014   Makoto Fujimura
Fujimura is an artist and writer whose work represents a spiritual and bicultural contemplation of the world. As a Japanese-American, Fujimura was the first non-native to participate in the Japanese painting doctorate program at the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts, and having lived and trained in Japan and the US, he has fused western styles with the traditional Nihonga techniques. Fujimura’s work is internationally recognized: he was a presidential appointee to the National Council on the Arts from 2003–2009 and he is the founder of the arts advocacy organization International Arts Movement (IAM). Much of Fujimura’s art is deeply religious. His second book, Refractions: A Journey of Faith, Art and Culture, is a collection of essays by contributors of various religious and cultural backgrounds reflecting on art, faith, and the world.
 
2013   Meredith Monk
Monk is a composer, singer, director/choreographer, filmmaker, and creator of new opera and music-theater works. Over the last five decades, she has been acclaimed by audiences and critics as a major creative force in the performing arts, and a pioneer in what is now called “extended vocal technique.” In 1968, Ms. Monk founded The House, a company dedicated to an interdisciplinary approach to performance. In 1978, she formed Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble to further expand her musical textures and forms. Ms. Monk has been a practicing Buddhist since 1985 and in 1999 performed a “Vocal Offering” for His Holiness the Dalai Lama at the World Sacred Music Festival.
 
2012   Holland Cotter
Cotter, a 2009 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, is one of the most prominent art critics in the United States. He has been a staff art critic for The New York Times since 1998. Cotter's work has consistently called attention to religion and its roles in artistic production across time, space, and multiple religious traditions.
 
2011   Gary Snyder
Snyder is a Pulitzer Prize winning poet, essayist, and environmental activist. He has published eighteen books, which have been translated into more than twenty languages. Snyder’s work and thinking has been featured in video specials on BBC and PBS, and in every major national print organ. A key member of the mid-twentieth century San Francisco Renaissance literary movement, Snyder is currently professor emeritus at the University of California, Davis, and lives in Northern California. He has spent ongoing time in Japan, undertaking extensive training in the Rinzai school of Zen Buddhism.
 
2010   Ena Heller
Heller, the Executive Director of the Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA), New York City, has focused on building places of learning within museums. While working on a Ph.D. in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, she learned the workings of various museum departments through jobs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. After graduation, she focused her attention on establishing new places of learning through art, first at the Gallery at the American Bible Society and later as founding director of MOBIA. MOBIA was conceived as a learning museum, whose unique mission is illustrated by noteworthy exhibitions and publications.
 
2009   Zarqa Nawaz
Nawaz is the driving force behind Fundamentalist Films and the creator of Little Mosque on the Prairie, which debuted to large audiences and tremendous acclaim in 2007. Nawaz, born in Liverpool and raised in Toronto, had a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Toronto in her hands when she realized that staying out of medical school would be her greatest contribution to Canada’s health care system. Unfazed, she coolly switched career plans and received a Bachelor of Applied Arts in Journalism from Ryerson in 1992. Nawaz worked as a freelance writer/broadcaster with CBC radio, and in various capacities with CBC Newworld, CTV’s Canada AM, and CBC’s The National. Bored with journalism, Nawaz took a summer film workshop at the Ontario College for Art and made BBQ Muslims, a short film that premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in 1996. Other short film credits include Fred’s Burqa and Random Check. In 2005, Nawaz’s documentary entitled Me and the Mosque, a coproduction with the National Film Board and the CBC, was broadcast on CBC’s Rough Cuts.
 
2008      Betye and Alison Saar
In multiple media, prints, collage, assemblage, sculpture, and installation, Betye Saar (b. 1926) and Alison Saar (b. 1956) push the boundaries and categories of art and religion. With works in the collections of the finest arts institutions and museums, the two have been hailed as "conjure women of the arts." Each one practices a synthetic art, creating material shape for persistent spiritual and cultural questions of identity, ethnicity, race, religion, and gender. Betye Saar's Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972) has acquired virtual iconic status. The shrines and altars she creates explore mysticism and vodou as well as racial and sexual politics. Alison Saar's installations, objects, and sculptures pursue relations among spiritualities in African cultural diaspora. Each one of these women might be justifiably hailed as an insider artist for persuasively, creatively bringing personal encounters with visionary, vernacular, and "outsider" arts of many cultures to public attention.
 
2007      Bill Viola
A pioneering video artist whose internationally exhibited work explores universal human experiences—birth, death, the unfolding of consciousness—and has its roots in religious traditions including Zen Buddhism, Islamic Sufism, and Christian mysticism.